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Speedy Drivers

The latest Tempcover research has revealed the UK’s speeding and motoring offence hotspots.

We’ve developed an interactive map based on 10 years of speeding driver data – hover over the map to see how your region compares to others!


South East

Number of fixed penalty notices:
3,356,187 (17%)

Top speeding car (2019/20)
Speed: 158 mph
Model: Seat Leon (Surrey)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

Yorkshire and the HumberSouth EastNorth WestEast of EnglandWest MidlandsSouth WestEast MidlandsLondonNorth EastSouth WalesSouth Western ScotlandEastern ScotlandNorth WalesNorth Eastern ScotlandDyfed-PowysHighlands and IslandsNorthern Ireland

Yorkshire and the Humber

Number of fixed penalty notices:
2,425,908 (12%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 162 mph
Model: BMW M3 (South Yorkshire)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

South East

Number of fixed penalty notices:
3,356,187 (17%)

Top speeding car (2019/20)
Speed: 158 mph
Model: Seat Leon (Surrey)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

North West

Number of fixed penalty notices:
2,898,250 (15%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 153 mph
Model: Audi Quattro (Greater Manchester)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

East of England

Number of fixed penalty notices:
2,752,770 (14%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 148 mph
Model: Not identified - camera issue (Essex)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

West Midlands

Number of fixed penalty notices:
2,025,486 (10%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 136 mph
Model: BMW 330D - Police Vehicle (West Midlands)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

South West

Number of fixed penalty notices:
1,820,009 (9%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 157 mph
Model: Ford Fiesta (Avon and Somerset)

Most common outcome:
Fine

East Midlands

Number of fixed penalty notices:
1,499,279 (8%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 146 mph
Model: BMW 3 Series – Police Vehicle (Debyshire)

Most common outcome:
Fine

London

Number of fixed penalty notices:
1,027,212 (5%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 134 mph
Model: Tesla Model 3 Standard Range (City)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

North East

Number of fixed penalty notices:
823,965 (4%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 113 mph
Model: Volkswagen Caddy (Northumbria)

Most common outcome:
Speed awareness course

South Wales

Number of fixed penalty notices:
352,584 (2%)

South Western Scotland

Number of fixed penalty notices:
248,589 (1%)

Eastern Scotland

Number of fixed penalty notices:
187,181 (1%)

North Wales

Number of fixed penalty notices:
155,438 (1%)

North Eastern Scotland

Number of fixed penalty notices:
57,641 (<1%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 153 mph
Model: Ford Focus RS

Dyfed-Powys

Number of fixed penalty notices:
19,625 (<1%)

Most common outcome (Wales):
Fine

Highlands and Islands

Number of fixed penalty notices:
72,520 (<1%)

Northern Ireland

Number of fixed penalty notices:
70,538 (<1%)

Top speeding car (2019/20):
Speed: 127 mph X 2
Model: Audi A6 and a Ford Focus


Our Key Findings

The number of FPNs issued has increased by 40% between 2011 and 2019. In 2019 alone, police forces across the UK issued 2,620,905 speeding tickets.

The South East currently ranks as the UK’s speeding hotspot with 3,356,187 FPNs issued between 2011 and 2019.

A BMW M3 was captured doing 162 mph on the M1 in South Yorkshire. The driver was caught and issued with an FPN.

 

SPEED AWARENESS QUIZ

Click below to test your speed awareness knowledge in our quiz!

You scored:

Well done! Check out these resources to brush up on your knowledge further.

Well done! Check out these resources to brush up on your knowledge further.

NEXT QUESTION

1. What speed can you drive in an emergency? (Question 1 of 10)

Legally, it is the posted speed limit, and anything over would be considered speeding, even in an emergency.

NEXT QUESTION

2. On a dual carriageway, what is the national speed limit when driving a van over 2 tonnes? (Question 2 of 10)

If the total weight of your vehicle is under 2 tonnes, you may be classed as a ‘car-derived van’ or ‘dual-purpose vehicle’ and be able to drive the speed limits applied to cars.

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3. What is the national speed limit in a residential area? (Question 3 of 10)

If you are unsure if you are driving in a residential speed limit area, streetlights are a good indicator that you are, according to rule 124 from the Highway code.

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4. What is the minimum penalty for speeding in the UK? (Question 4 of 10)

Provided you are not a repeat offender, you may be able to avoid the points and opt for a speed awareness course if you are eligible. Eligibility depends on which police force is handling your offence.

NEXT QUESTION

5. What is the maximum fine for speeding in the UK? (Question 5 of 10)

For the most serious speeding offences, like driving 41 mph or over in a 20 mph zone, you could be fined up to 175% of your weekly income – capped at £1,000 on normal roads and £2,500 on motorways (>101mph). You’ll also get 6 points or up to 56 days’ disqualification!

NEXT QUESTION

6. What does this sign mean? (Question 6 of 10)

Although minimum speed is not enforceable by law, it is still possible to get pulled over by police if slow driving on a fast-moving road causes a safety risk to other motorists. 

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7. What is the stopping distance at 70 mph? (Question 7 of 10)

At 70 mph, it will take 315 feet (or 24 car lengths) for your car to come to a complete stop – in icy conditions it could take ten times longer, so always keep a safe distance. 

NEXT QUESTION

8. If a pedestrian is hit by a vehicle travelling at 35 mph, what is the likelihood of survival? (Question 8 of 10)

According to Roadwise, a further 5 mph increase to 40 mph would see the likelihood of survival drop to only 10%. However, at a speed of 30 mph, the chances of survival increases to 80%.

NEXT QUESTION

9. How many serious injuries are caused annually in the UK by speeding drivers? (Question 9 of 10)

According to The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, in 2018 there were 186 deaths due to speeding, 112 deaths due speeding in inappropriate conditions, 1,505 serious injuries and 5,500 slight injuries.

NEXT QUESTION

10. In 2019, what proportion of UK drivers exceeded the speed limit on 30 mph roads? (Question 10 of 10)

According to the 2019 Vehicle speed compliance statistics for Great Britain, 50% of cars exceeded the speed limit on motorways, 9% exceeded the national limit on single carriageways and 54% exceeded the speed limit on 30 mph roads.

SHOW RESULTS

Full Report

The Tempcover Speeding Hotspots report shows a significant increase in offences over the last ten years. Although some haven’t resulted in FPNs, there’s been an upward trend in fines and sanctions. As such, it’s more important than ever to be aware of and insured against the latest dangers. Britain’s roads may be safe on the whole. However, the data shows that offences capable of creating an accident are on the up.

Tempcover Speeding Hotspots: Our Findings

Police in the UK issued 19,796,287 speeding fines over the last ten years. Our report breaks down these statistics and looks at the where, why and how of motoring offences across the country.

Speediest Regions and Fastest Cars Caught in Each Region

The speediest region in the UK is the South East. Between 2011 and 2019, police in the South East issued 3,356,187 FPNs. That’s 14% higher than the next speediest region, the North West (2,898,250 FPNs).

Fixed Penalty Notices: The Top 11 Speediest Regions

  1. South East – 3,356,187
  2. North West – 2,898,250
  3. East of England – 2,752,770
  4. Yorkshire and the Humber – 2,425,908
  5. West Midlands – 2,025,486
  6. South West – 1,820,009
  7. East Midlands – 1,499,279
  8. London – 1,027,212
  9. North East – 823,965
  10. South Wales – 352,584
  11. South Western Scotland – 248,589

With millions of FPNs issued, there have been some notable speeds clocked on British roads. Between 2019 and 2020, the biggest speeding fines in the UK clocked vehicles travelling as fast as 162 mph:

  • 162 mph – BMW M3 – M1 Junction 31 in South Yorkshire
  • 158 mph – Seat Leon – M3 in Surrey
  • 157 mph – Ford Fiesta – M4 Westbound in Avon and Somerset
  • 153 mph – Ford Focus RS – A956 Cleanhill to Charleston in Scotland
  • 153 mph – Audi Quattro – M62 Westbound in Greater Manchester

Which Police Force Issues the Most FPNs?

From our research, Thames Valley Police issues the most FPNs. To put it another way, you can say this police force is the most proactive when it comes to catching and fining speeders. Between 2019 and 2020, the force issued 438,621 FPNs. In contrast, Gwent police force issued just 2,363 fines.

The Top Five Forces Issuing FPNs

  • Thames Valley = 438,621 FPNs issued between 2019 and 2020.
  • Avon and Somerset = 375,418 FPNs issued between 2019 and 2020.
  • West Yorkshire = 306,697 FPNs issued between 2019 and 2020.
  • Metropolitan Police = 305,526 FPNs issued between 2019 and 2020.
  • South Wales = 274,968 FPNs issued between 2019 and 2020.

The Most Common Outcomes for Speeding Fines by Region

The most common outcome for speeding fines in the UK is an order to take a driver awareness course. Of all the people caught speeding in a ten-year period, 77% (6,210,391) attended a speed awareness course.

On a regional level, only three buck the trend of offering retraining as the preferred response to a speeding offence:

  • South East – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • East of England – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • North West – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • Yorkshire and the Humber – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • West Midlands – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • North East – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • London – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Driver retraining
  • South West – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Fine
  • East Midlands – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Fine
  • Wales – Predominant Outcome for Speeding = Fine

Where Are Speeding Fines Most Likely to be Dropped?

If you get caught speeding in West Midlands, it’s more likely a fine will be dropped than if the incident happened in Norfolk. In fact, according to the data, you’re 18% more likely to have a fine cancelled in the West Midlands than Norfolk.

Top 10 Regions Where You’re Most Likely to Have a Speeding Fine Cancelled

  1. West Midlands – 31% of the 158,172 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  2. Warwickshire – 28% of the 108,653 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  3. Hertfordshire – 25% of the 132,671 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  4. Greater Manchester – 21% of the 215,319 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  5. Bedfordshire – 20% of the 91,332 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  6. West Yorkshire – 17% of the 193,772 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  7. Metropolitan Police- 17% of the 166,104 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  8. Sussex – 15% of the 84,704 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  9. Avon and Somerset – 13% of the 147,900 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.
  10. Norfolk – 13% of the 76,408 fines issued were written off between 2019 and 2020.

How Has the Amount of Speeding Fines Increased?

The number of fixed penalty notices issued across the UK between 2011 and 2019 has increased 40%. In 2019 alone, police issued 2,620,905 speeding tickets. The biggest year-on-year increase came in 2014 when FPNs increased by 8%. Our data suggests the increase in fines is linked to an increase in speed cameras. As of 2020, 94% of all speeding fines resulted from drivers being caught on camera.

The Negative Impact of Speeding: Fatalities and Injuries

There were 78,855 accidents in 2019 where speed was a contributory factor, as reported by an attending police officer. Even if you exclude cases where an officer wasn’t on scene to attribute excess speed as a cause, the figure is still over 70,000. 

You can add to this 221 collisions in Northern Ireland due to “excess speed”. Finally, there were 106,981 casualties caused by speeding in the UK in 2019. That means almost 200,000 deaths or injuries were caused by people driving too fast in the UK and Northern Ireland that year. 

Fatal Accidents by Cause (UK)

  • Exceeding the Speed Limit = 215
  • Travelling Too Fast for the Conditions = 99
  • Exceeding Speed Limit or Travelling Too Fast = 314

Serious Injuries and Accidents by Cause (UK)

  • Exceeding the Speed Limit = 1,535
  • Travelling Too Fast for the Conditions = 1,102
  • Exceeding Speed Limit or Travelling Too Fast = 2,637

Minor Injuries and Accidents by Cause (UK)

  • Exceeding the Speed Limit = 2,913
  • Travelling Too Fast for the Conditions = 2,685
  • Exceeding Speed Limit or Travelling Too Fast = 5,598

Other Non-Speeding Offences

It’s not just speeding that’s becoming a bigger hazard on British roads. Today, people are picking up fines and points on their licence for a litany of offences. Two of the most common motoring offences in London are bus lane infringements and insurance issues, including expired policies and court action.

Elsewhere in the country, mobile phone related offences, parking fines and dangerous driving contribute to 5,298,834 non-speeding FPNs. Of the most common non-speeding offences you could be charged for, the top five all result in fines (the majority of the time):

  • Obstruction, waiting and parking offences = 430,579 fines issued.
  • Neglect of traffic directions = 412,787 fines issued.
  • Seat belt offences = 364,981 fines issued.
  • Use of hand-held mobile phone while driving = 355,406 fines issued.
  • Vehicle test offences = 337,605 fines issued.

The most likely instance you’ll be offered driver retraining instead of a fine is an offence “involving careless driving” where a mobile phone is not involved. In almost every other scenario, you’re likely to be fined for a non-speeding offence.

Tempcover Speeding Hotspots Resources

Use our interactive map to unlock more insights into speeding and non-motoring offences in your region. You can also take our speed awareness quiz to see if you’re equipped to drive safely on British roads and avoid FPNs.

Once you understand the driving dynamics in your local region and beyond, make sure you’ve got the insurance to cover all eventualities. Tempcover is the leading provider of short-term protection. Our policies provide temporary solutions that will keep you and your vehicle safe at all times.

Tempcover Speeding Hotspots Methodology

Our research includes a combination of national surveys and freedom of information requests. By collating data from various sources, our experts have created a complete overview of motoring offences in the UK and, more specifically, each region.

Alongside police records and information from the Highways Agency, the foundation of our report was built on search engine queries. We looked at search volumes over the last 12 months and since the UK’s COVID-19 lockdown measures were implemented in March 2020.

We reviewed thousands of results from each region. In total, our report includes data from 27 different search queries, including:

  • How long is a ban for drink driving?
  • How many points on a licence before you get a ban?
  • What is the speed limit on dual carriageways?
  • How to avoid a speeding fine?
  • How to avoid paying a bus lane fine?

We combined the data from each region with information taken from official government sources. This allowed us to create a comprehensive report on the nature, frequency and common consequences of speeding and motoring offences in the UK.  

Use our get a quote button to input our details and get a free, instant short-term insurance policy quote that will keep you safe today!

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Authored by: Paul Salter, Tempcover Chief Product Officer

Citations & References
Quiz questions: GOV UK – Vehicle speed compliance statistics for Great Britain 2019, GOV UK – Speed Limits, ROSPA – Speeding Information

FOI requests: Crime and Police Analysis Unit, Police Service of Northern Ireland, Scottish Government